DEBATING DESIGN AND VIOLENCE AT MOMA

Design has a history of violence. It can be an act of creative destruction and a double-edged sword, surprising us with consequences intended or unintended. Yet professional discourse has been dominated by voices that only trumpet design’s commercial and aesthetic successes.

Massoud Hassani (Dutch, b. Afghanistan 1983). Design Academy Eindhoven (The Netherlands, est. 1947). Mine Kafon wind-powered deminer. 2011. Bamboo and biodegradable plastics. 87 x 87 x 87" (221 x 221 x 221 cm). Gift of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, 2012. Photographs courtesy of Hassani Design BV
Massoud Hassani (Dutch, b. Afghanistan 1983). Design Academy Eindhoven (The Netherlands, est. 1947). Mine Kafon wind-powered deminer. 2011. Bamboo and biodegradable plastics. 87 x 87 x 87″ (221 x 221 x 221 cm). Gift of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, 2012. Photographs courtesy of Hassani Design BV

Design and violence is an ongoing online curatorial experiment that explores the manifestations of violence in contemporary society by pairing critical thinkers with examples of challenging design work. For this debate series, spanning four evenings, the curators paola antonelli and jamer hunt have chosen four of the most provocative case studies to further explore the ambiguous relationship between design and violence. In each event, two debaters will tackle an object, taking opposite sides and arguing the faults and merits of the project and the contemporary issues that surround it. A lively group discussion will follow.

Defense Distributed. The Liberator pistol. 2013. BSplus thermoplastic, nail, 2 1/2 x 8 1/2″ (6.35 x 21.59 cm). Photo: Michael Thad Carter for Forbes. Courtesy of Defense Distributed
Defense Distributed. The Liberator pistol. 2013. BSplus thermoplastic, nail, 2 1/2 x 8 1/2″ (6.35 x 21.59 cm). Photo: Michael Thad Carter for Forbes. Courtesy of Defense Distributed

Design and Violence Debate: Debate I
Moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli, the first debate centers upon The Liberator, the world’s first 3-D printed gun. The gun’s designer Cody Wilson and author and journalist Rob Walker, (Yahoo Tech, The New York Times, Design Observer) will deliver debate motions, after which will follow a discussion focused on open-source design, the limits of gun laws and rights, and our assumptions about the ethics of design.

Left: Ralph Borland, Suited for Subversion, 2002. Nylon, reinforced PVC, denim, padding, speaker, pulse-reader, circuitry.  Right: SPUTNIKO!, Menstruation Machine. Takashi’s Take. The machine was developed with research support from Professor Jan Brosens at the Department of Medicine, Imperial College London.
Left: Ralph Borland, Suited for Subversion, 2002. Nylon, reinforced PVC, denim, padding, speaker, pulse-reader, circuitry.
Right: SPUTNIKO!, Menstruation Machine. Takashi’s Take. The machine was developed with research support from Professor Jan Brosens at the Department of Medicine, Imperial College London.

Design and Violence Debate: Debate II
The second debate focuses on the
The second debate focuses on the Menstruation Machine(2010), designed by Sputniko! (aka Hiromi Ozaki) to allow its wearer to experience the pain and tribulation of menstruation, regardless of his or her age or gender. Chris Bobel (author,New Blood: Third-wave Feminism and the Politics of Menstruation) and Mickey Boardman, (Editorial Director,Paper magazine) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Jamer Hunt.

Design and Violence Debate: Debate III The third debate will center upon Temple Grandin’s “serpentine ramp,” a slaughterhouse design modification that attempts stress reduction and a more humane death for animals. Professor Gary L. Francione (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers, and author, Eat Like You Care: An Examination of the Morality of Eating Animals) and Nicola Twilley (editor/author of Edible Geography.com, co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and director of Studio-X NYC) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli.
Design and Violence Debate: Debate III
The third debate will center upon Temple Grandin’s “serpentine ramp,” a slaughterhouse design modification that attempts stress reduction and a more humane death for animals. Professor Gary L. Francione (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers, and author, Eat Like You Care: An Examination of the Morality of Eating Animals) and Nicola Twilley (editor/author of Edible Geography.com, co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and director of Studio-X NYC) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli.

Design and Violence Debate: Debate III
The third debate will center upon Temple Grandin’s “serpentine ramp,” a slaughterhouse design modification that attempts stress reduction and a more humane death for animals. Professor Gary L. Francione (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers, and author, Eat Like You Care: An Examination of the Morality of Eating Animals) and Nicola Twilley (editor/author of Edible Geography.com, co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and director of Studio-X NYC) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli.

Guy Mishaly (Israeli, b. 1983), Department of Industrial Design (est. 1983), Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Israel, est. 1906). BLAST chair by explosion. 2011. Steel, 12 x 12 x 20" (30 x 30 x 50 cm). Image and video courtesy of the designer. Photo by Oded Antman
Guy Mishaly (Israeli, b. 1983), Department of Industrial Design (est. 1983), Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Israel, est. 1906). BLAST chair by explosion. 2011. Steel, 12 x 12 x 20″ (30 x 30 x 50 cm). Image and video courtesy of the designer. Photo by Oded Antman
Exhaust, 1997, Diller + Scofidio; Photo: Michael Moran/OTTO | Fountain, 1997, Diller + Scofidio; Photo: Michael Moran/OTTO
Exhaust, 1997, Diller + Scofidio; Photo: Michael Moran/OTTO | Fountain, 1997, Diller + Scofidio; Photo: Michael Moran/OTTO
The guardian angel handbag - Vlieger and Vandam
The guardian angel handbag – Vlieger and Vandam
An silk satin and tulle evening shoe by Roger Vivier for Christian Dior (1954), examined by Design and Violence in terms of the stiletto heel IMAGE courtesy of V&A Museum
An silk satin and tulle evening shoe by Roger Vivier for Christian Dior (1954), examined by Design and Violence in terms of the stiletto heel
IMAGE courtesy of V&A Museum

 

Sissel Tolaas and Nick Knight's Violence; a project currently in process that is being conducted and documented on SHOWstudio.com IMAGE Jamer Hunt
Sissel Tolaas and Nick Knight’s Violence; a project currently in process that is being conducted and documented on SHOWstudio.com
IMAGE Jamer Hunt